DAILY DESIGN CHALLENGE - HEURISTIC EVALUTION ON MOBILE APP

Objective

I aim to disseminate insights on UI design guidelines, specifically focusing on Nielsen and Molich's 10 general principles for interaction design, known as "heuristics" 🚩.

Engaging in this exercise serves as a valuable tool to refine my UI design skills. Through daily design challenges, I enhance my problem-solving mindset and explore innovative solutions. Wishing you the best in your design exploration and challenges.

Tools:

Figma

Role:

Product Designer (UX/UI)

Team:

Self Directed

Timeline:

2 Months (4 Sprints)

1. Visibility of system status

The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time.All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point 1, Visibility of system status.I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Is the user aware of their current position within the user journey?

  2. is the user notified about changes in their user journey?

  3. Is the user aware of factors that can have a significant impact on their experience?

  4. Is there any informative feedback from the system?

  • visibility-system-status-01
  • visibility-system-status-01
  • visibility-system-status-01
  • visibility-system-status-01
  • visibility-system-status-01

2. Match between system and the real world

The system should speak the users’ language, with words, phrases, and concepts familiar to the user, rather than system-oriented terms. Follow real-world conventions, making information appear in a natural and logical order.

All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point 2, Match between system and the real world.
I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Are UI elements and interactions easily recognized?

  2. Does the online experience replicate the familiarity of offline actions and behavior?

  3. Does the product use acronyms, technical terms, or jargon that needs explanation? If acronyms are used, are they read clearly?

  • matchbetween-realword
  • matchbetween-realword
  • matchbetween-realword
  • matchbetween-realword
  • matchbetween-realword

3. User Control and Freedom

When users make mistakes they should be equipped with tools and actions that allow them to revert back to previous states; as a designer you should support undo and redo. Always design a clearly marked 'emergency exit' to let the user leave the unwanted state without having to go through an extended dialogue. All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point 3, User Control and Freedom. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Is the user able to exit all states, such as pop-ups and multimedia? Is the exit state consistent and clear?

  2. Does the user have control over their personal information?

  3. Is the user able to use the core of the website or apps without signing up?

  • user-control-and-freedom
  • user-control-and-freedom
  • user-control-and-freedom
  • user-control-and-freedom

4. Consistency and standards

Users should not have to wonder whether different words, situations, or actions mean the same thing.This rule is often used and easy to recognise on visual elements of the interface especially on usage button call to action, field forms, visual icon design and typography style.

All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 4, Consistency and standards. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Is there a consistent design standard for all buttons (CTA) on the website or apps?

  2. Is there a consistent design standard for form fields?

  3. Is there a consistent design standard for typography? Headings, Sub-headings, body text etc.

  • consistency-standart
  • consistency-standart
  • consistency-standart
  • consistency-standart

5. Error Prevention

Even better than good error messages is a careful design which prevents a problem from occurring in the first place. Either eliminate error-prone conditions or check for them and present users with a confirmation option before they commit to the action. In other words.

As the saying goes, 'prevention is better than cure'; systems should be designed to limit the scope for user error, rather than try to find 'best fixes'. All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 5, Error Prevention. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Are there design restrictions that can prevent a user from making a mistake?

  2. Does the user guide have suggestions for preventing wrong actions?

  3. Is there auto correction when the user makes a mistake with the system?

  • error-prevention
  • error-prevention
  • error-prevention
  • error-prevention

6. Recognition rather than recall

Minimize the user’s memory load by making objects, actions, and options visible. The user should not have to remember information from one part of the dialogue to another. Instructions for use of the system should be visible or easily retrievable whenever appropriate.

All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 6, Recognition rather than recall. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Whether the user is given a list of products or pages just viewed?

  2. Is the user given special content based on previous actions?

  3. Is the user given navigation items that reduce cognitive content or are easy to understand / intuitive?

  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall

7. Flexibility and efficiency of use

Accelerators — unseen by the novice user — may often speed up the interaction for the expert user such that the system can cater to both inexperienced and experienced users. Allow users to tailor frequent actions.

In other words, most of this rule is used to create a shortcut in a software design. Such as copy actions on our computer, we can use shortcuts on our keyboard by pressing cmd + c for Mac OS and ctrl + C for windows.


All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 7, Flexibility and efficiency of use. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Are users given a shortcut to complete their tasks on the product?

  2. Can users customize or create shortcuts for frequently performed actions?

  3. Is there an option to speed up the task of the user to achieve his goals?

  • flexibilty
  • flexibilty
  • flexibilty
  • flexibilty
  • flexibilty

8. Aesthetic and minimalist design

Dialogues should not contain information which is irrelevant or rarely needed. Every extra unit of information in a dialogue competes with the relevant units of information and diminishes their relative visibility.

What does it really mean? This sounds familiar as we are following this as a routine. Aesthetic and Minimalist design is not about adding white space. It's all about giving relevant data and removing all the unwanted things. The goal is to limit the amount of information the user must scan to locate relevant information within the interface.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 8, Aesthetic and minimalist design. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Is the user interface design simple and easy to understand?

  2. Are users clear about what all icons mean and why they are included in the design?

  3. Are all forms easy to understand and easy to fill in?

  • aestethic-minimalism
  • aestethic-minimalism
  • aestethic-minimalism
  • aestethic-minimalism
  • aestethic-minimalism

9. Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors

Error messages should be expressed in plain language (no codes), precisely indicate the problem, and constructively suggest a solution. In other words the interface design should help the users to identify what is the exact error and suggest a way to get rid of that. If the user is not getting a helping hand on an error, they will definitely move away from the product.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 9, Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Is the user being presented with an error message (no message) compilation adding wrong information in the form or in the dialogue?

  2. Are users given human-readable error messages that offer useful information about how to correct problems?

  3. Are users given an error message that doesn't blame the user for the error?

  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors
  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors
  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors
  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors
  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors
  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors

10. Help and documentation

Even though it is better if the system can be used without documentation, it may be necessary to provide help and documentation. Any such information should be easy to search, focused on the user’s task, list concrete steps to be carried out, and not be too large.

All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 10, Help and documentation. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Are users given clear steps / guidelines for using product services?

  2. Do users have access to documentation on relevant topics to help achieve their goals?

  3. Are users given another communication channel to ask for help in achieving their goals?

  • Help and documentation
  • Help and documentation
  • Help and documentation
  • Help and documentation

DAILY DESIGN CHALLENGE - HEURISTIC EVALUTION ON MOBILE APP

Objective

I aim to disseminate insights on UI design guidelines, specifically focusing on Nielsen and Molich's 10 general principles for interaction design, known as "heuristics" 🚩.

Engaging in this exercise serves as a valuable tool to refine my UI design skills. Through daily design challenges, I enhance my problem-solving mindset and explore innovative solutions. Wishing you the best in your design exploration and challenges.

Tools:

Figma

Role:

Product Designer (UX/UI)

Team:

Self Directed

Timeline:

2 Months (4 Sprints)

1. Visibility of system status

The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time.All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point 1, Visibility of system status.I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Is the user aware of their current position within the user journey?

  2. is the user notified about changes in their user journey?

  3. Is the user aware of factors that can have a significant impact on their experience?

  4. Is there any informative feedback from the system?

  • visibility-system-status-01
  • visibility-system-status-01
  • visibility-system-status-01
  • visibility-system-status-01
  • visibility-system-status-01

2. Match between system and the real world

The system should speak the users’ language, with words, phrases, and concepts familiar to the user, rather than system-oriented terms. Follow real-world conventions, making information appear in a natural and logical order.

All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point 2, Match between system and the real world.
I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Are UI elements and interactions easily recognized?

  2. Does the online experience replicate the familiarity of offline actions and behavior?

  3. Does the product use acronyms, technical terms, or jargon that needs explanation? If acronyms are used, are they read clearly?

  • matchbetween-realword
  • matchbetween-realword
  • matchbetween-realword
  • matchbetween-realword
  • matchbetween-realword

3. User Control and Freedom

When users make mistakes they should be equipped with tools and actions that allow them to revert back to previous states; as a designer you should support undo and redo. Always design a clearly marked 'emergency exit' to let the user leave the unwanted state without having to go through an extended dialogue. All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point 3, User Control and Freedom. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Is the user able to exit all states, such as pop-ups and multimedia? Is the exit state consistent and clear?

  2. Does the user have control over their personal information?

  3. Is the user able to use the core of the website or apps without signing up?

  • user-control-and-freedom
  • user-control-and-freedom
  • user-control-and-freedom
  • user-control-and-freedom

4. Consistency and standards

Users should not have to wonder whether different words, situations, or actions mean the same thing.This rule is often used and easy to recognise on visual elements of the interface especially on usage button call to action, field forms, visual icon design and typography style.

All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 4, Consistency and standards. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Is there a consistent design standard for all buttons (CTA) on the website or apps?

  2. Is there a consistent design standard for form fields?

  3. Is there a consistent design standard for typography? Headings, Sub-headings, body text etc.

  • consistency-standart
  • consistency-standart
  • consistency-standart
  • consistency-standart

5. Error Prevention

Even better than good error messages is a careful design which prevents a problem from occurring in the first place. Either eliminate error-prone conditions or check for them and present users with a confirmation option before they commit to the action. In other words.

As the saying goes, 'prevention is better than cure'; systems should be designed to limit the scope for user error, rather than try to find 'best fixes'. All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 5, Error Prevention. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Are there design restrictions that can prevent a user from making a mistake?

  2. Does the user guide have suggestions for preventing wrong actions?

  3. Is there auto correction when the user makes a mistake with the system?

  • error-prevention
  • error-prevention
  • error-prevention
  • error-prevention

6. Recognition rather than recall

Minimize the user’s memory load by making objects, actions, and options visible. The user should not have to remember information from one part of the dialogue to another. Instructions for use of the system should be visible or easily retrievable whenever appropriate.

All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 6, Recognition rather than recall. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Whether the user is given a list of products or pages just viewed?

  2. Is the user given special content based on previous actions?

  3. Is the user given navigation items that reduce cognitive content or are easy to understand / intuitive?

  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall

7. Flexibility and efficiency of use

Accelerators — unseen by the novice user — may often speed up the interaction for the expert user such that the system can cater to both inexperienced and experienced users. Allow users to tailor frequent actions.

In other words, most of this rule is used to create a shortcut in a software design. Such as copy actions on our computer, we can use shortcuts on our keyboard by pressing cmd + c for Mac OS and ctrl + C for windows.


All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 7, Flexibility and efficiency of use. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Are users given a shortcut to complete their tasks on the product?

  2. Can users customize or create shortcuts for frequently performed actions?

  3. Is there an option to speed up the task of the user to achieve his goals?

  • flexibilty
  • flexibilty
  • flexibilty
  • flexibilty
  • flexibilty

8. Aesthetic and minimalist design

Dialogues should not contain information which is irrelevant or rarely needed. Every extra unit of information in a dialogue competes with the relevant units of information and diminishes their relative visibility.

What does it really mean? This sounds familiar as we are following this as a routine. Aesthetic and Minimalist design is not about adding white space. It's all about giving relevant data and removing all the unwanted things. The goal is to limit the amount of information the user must scan to locate relevant information within the interface.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 8, Aesthetic and minimalist design. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Is the user interface design simple and easy to understand?

  2. Are users clear about what all icons mean and why they are included in the design?

  3. Are all forms easy to understand and easy to fill in?

  • aestethic-minimalism
  • aestethic-minimalism
  • aestethic-minimalism
  • aestethic-minimalism
  • aestethic-minimalism

9. Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors

Error messages should be expressed in plain language (no codes), precisely indicate the problem, and constructively suggest a solution. In other words the interface design should help the users to identify what is the exact error and suggest a way to get rid of that. If the user is not getting a helping hand on an error, they will definitely move away from the product.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 9, Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Is the user being presented with an error message (no message) compilation adding wrong information in the form or in the dialogue?

  2. Are users given human-readable error messages that offer useful information about how to correct problems?

  3. Are users given an error message that doesn't blame the user for the error?

  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors
  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors
  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors
  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors
  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors
  • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors

10. Help and documentation

Even though it is better if the system can be used without documentation, it may be necessary to provide help and documentation. Any such information should be easy to search, focused on the user’s task, list concrete steps to be carried out, and not be too large.

All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 10, Help and documentation. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Are users given clear steps / guidelines for using product services?

  2. Do users have access to documentation on relevant topics to help achieve their goals?

  3. Are users given another communication channel to ask for help in achieving their goals?

  • Help and documentation
  • Help and documentation
  • Help and documentation
  • Help and documentation

DAILY DESIGN CHALLENGE - HEURISTIC EVALUTION ON MOBILE APP

Objective

I aim to disseminate insights on UI design guidelines, specifically focusing on Nielsen and Molich's 10 general principles for interaction design, known as "heuristics" 🚩.

Engaging in this exercise serves as a valuable tool to refine my UI design skills. Through daily design challenges, I enhance my problem-solving mindset and explore innovative solutions. Wishing you the best in your design exploration and challenges.

Tools:

Figma

Role:

Product Designer (UX/UI)

Team:

Self Directed

Timeline:

2 Months (4 Sprints)

1. Visibility of system status

The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time.All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point 1, Visibility of system status.I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Is the user aware of their current position within the user journey?

  2. is the user notified about changes in their user journey?

  3. Is the user aware of factors that can have a significant impact on their experience?

  4. Is there any informative feedback from the system?

  • visibility-system-status-01
  • visibility-system-status-01
  • visibility-system-status-01
  • visibility-system-status-01
  • visibility-system-status-01

2. Match between system and the real world

The system should speak the users’ language, with words, phrases, and concepts familiar to the user, rather than system-oriented terms. Follow real-world conventions, making information appear in a natural and logical order.

All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point 2, Match between system and the real world.
I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Are UI elements and interactions easily recognized?

  2. Does the online experience replicate the familiarity of offline actions and behavior?

  3. Does the product use acronyms, technical terms, or jargon that needs explanation? If acronyms are used, are they read clearly?

  • matchbetween-realword
  • matchbetween-realword
  • matchbetween-realword
  • matchbetween-realword
  • matchbetween-realword

3. User Control and Freedom

When users make mistakes they should be equipped with tools and actions that allow them to revert back to previous states; as a designer you should support undo and redo. Always design a clearly marked 'emergency exit' to let the user leave the unwanted state without having to go through an extended dialogue. All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point 3, User Control and Freedom. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Is the user able to exit all states, such as pop-ups and multimedia? Is the exit state consistent and clear?

  2. Does the user have control over their personal information?

  3. Is the user able to use the core of the website or apps without signing up?

  • user-control-and-freedom
  • user-control-and-freedom
  • user-control-and-freedom
  • user-control-and-freedom

4. Consistency and standards

Users should not have to wonder whether different words, situations, or actions mean the same thing.This rule is often used and easy to recognise on visual elements of the interface especially on usage button call to action, field forms, visual icon design and typography style.

All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 4, Consistency and standards. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Is there a consistent design standard for all buttons (CTA) on the website or apps?

  2. Is there a consistent design standard for form fields?

  3. Is there a consistent design standard for typography? Headings, Sub-headings, body text etc.

  • consistency-standart
  • consistency-standart
  • consistency-standart
  • consistency-standart

5. Error Prevention

Even better than good error messages is a careful design which prevents a problem from occurring in the first place. Either eliminate error-prone conditions or check for them and present users with a confirmation option before they commit to the action. In other words.

As the saying goes, 'prevention is better than cure'; systems should be designed to limit the scope for user error, rather than try to find 'best fixes'. All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 5, Error Prevention. I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Are there design restrictions that can prevent a user from making a mistake?

  2. Does the user guide have suggestions for preventing wrong actions?

  3. Is there auto correction when the user makes a mistake with the system?

  • error-prevention
  • error-prevention
  • error-prevention
  • error-prevention

6. Recognition rather than recall

Minimize the user’s memory load by making objects, actions, and options visible. The user should not have to remember information from one part of the dialogue to another. Instructions for use of the system should be visible or easily retrievable whenever appropriate.

All highlighted interfaces on this post is how this rule is implemented in interface design.

When conducting a Heuristic Evaluation on interface design that is intended to find usability problems at heuristic point number 6, Recognition rather than recall.
I usually make a question like the following:

  1. Whether the user is given a list of products or pages just viewed?

  2. Is the user given special content based on previous actions?

  3. Is the user given navigation items that reduce cognitive content or are easy to understand / intuitive?

  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall
  • recognition-ratherthan-recall